G8 in Bed with Hamas. Why?

Stephen Harper G8 2011Why is the G-8 in bed with Hamas? Why is it that when Abu Mazen, now serving year seven of a four year term joins forces with a true blue terror organization, the world, the West, who pays with their blood for the ideology of Islamic extremism thanks him?

Is it the same force that expelled Israel from this land 2000 years ago? That kept Jews oppressed throughout the world by the cross, by the crescent? The same force that nearly wiped out European Jewry during the Nazi regime?

The leaders of the G-8: Britain, France, Germany (the largest European sponsor of the Palestinians), Italy, Japan, Russia and the United States all agree on pressuring Israel to retreat to its pre-67 borders. Only Canada stood by its Jewish allies and were subsequently thanked by Foreign Minister Lieberman.

Meanwhile Abu Mazen will be returning to Cairo for the second time since signing the unity pact with Hamas. The talks to be held with the head of Egypt’s Higher Military Council, Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, will be centered on declaring statehood at the United Nations in September.

Abu Mazen – you bad ass!

Meanwhile, after Egypt opened up the Rafah crossing with Gaza last week, a Qassam rocket was fired from the Gaza Strip landing in Israel near the Eshkol Regional Council. No injuries were reported.

That’s life.

Below, Jackie Mason rants about Israel giving away land:

Is anti-Semitism on the Rise or Decrease in Venezuela?

A Jewish advocacy group in Venezuela is protesting a state-run radio broadcast referencing the “Protocols of the Elders of Zion.”

The Venezuelan Confederation of Israelite Associations filed a formal complaint with the Public Ministry denouncing the broadcast in which journalist Cristina Gonzalez read the anti-Semitic text and suggested listeners should read it:

“Venezuelan Jews know that promoting this anti-Semitic document only sows hate and discrimination, violating the Constitution of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela…I do not have an anti-Semitic stance, I’m not anti-anything, I read everything that falls my way…”

Salomon Cohen, the confederation president requested a formal investigation into the matter and a meeting with government officials.

Last year, President Hugo Chavez met with Jewish community representatives to discuss what they described as an “incessant barrage of anti-Semitic commentaries” on state-run media. As a positive result, there was a detectable decrease in anti-Semitic rhetoric. Increasing diplomatic signals from the Chavez government explained that relations between the Jewish community and the revolutionary state of Venezuela were improving.

However, Venezuelan anti-Semitism seems to be brewing again among the most radical elements of government supporters as Chavez gets ready for a reelection campaign next year.

Do Israelis Care About Arab Relations? or International Opinion?

A run down Muslim mosque in Tiberius. Israelis do not care and associate enough with Arabs to care.
A bad situation as a consequence of the Israeli-Palestinian-Arab wars raging ever since the state
became independent in 1948 / image from Israel pikiwiki: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:PikiWiki_Israel_11832_al_omari_mosque_in_tiberias.jpg
From US president Obama’s latest speeches and meeting with Israeli prime minister to business people trading all the way to tourists: one question is asked about Israel:

Do Israelis care about the Arabs? or care about peace with the Palestinians? Do they care about what others think of Israel’s image towards the Arabs? 

The short answer: Not always – Israelis are too isolated from Arabs to care much (this is a new development). They are also too disappointed from International media and even more from foreign leaders to care about their image. This is a new situation and it could change. Is this such a bad situation?  YES! ABSOLUTELY!  Israelis care about tsunami victims in Japan and earthquake victims in Haiti. So not caring about hungry Egyptians and their bread riots and Syrian dictatorship protest killing seems downright cruel. 


It’s hard for Israelis to forget the history between Israel and the Arabs. With all the fighting and public obscenities over 100 years, Israelis simply want the Arabs to go away. The Palestinian people and especially their leaders are essentially blamed by Israelis for being unable to make peace with Israeli leaders. There are many reasons (now called excuses) that Palestinians have not made peace with Israel. Here, time takes it toll on people. Time is what changed the Israeli state of mind towards peace. After so many years, almost a century, Israelis are just tired of “fighting for peace” (as the late Itzhak Rabin use to say). Add to the element of time three generations of Israelis born on the land with hopes for peace. There are disturbing signs of how much Israelis don’t care. The fence along Israel’ borders, essentially closing borders completely was a hotly debated issue just three years ago. Today Israelis accept the fence as an essential security measure. With it come complete isolation between Israel and all surrounding states. On the streets and building sites around Israel you see very few Palestinian workers. You see many more Chinese and Asian workers than Arabs. Just a few years ago, Palestinian complained that the only jobs they could get in Israel were construction and cleaning. Today they would have to stand in line behind a dozen other foreign nationals. Israelis are essentially isolated from Arabs. With the shift from accepting Palestinians now Israelis are looking for European and Asians to take place of the Palestinians. This sad state of affairs it a trend that will take years to reverse.

Sometimes Israelis compare the situation here to other places: they think back at the cold war in Europe. Did the Dutch care much about oppressive Hungarian regime? From the 1950s to the 1990s, what did the Swedish people do for the Albanians? Not much. When two nations are isolated, they do not influence each other. This is what happened in Israel with the Arabs. This includes the Palestinians and the surrounding Arab countries Jordan, Egypt, Syria and Lebanon. Before the second intifada (Sept. 2000 to 2006) Israelis remember shopping in villages east of Jerusalem for olive oil, goat cheese and furniture. Or going to a beach in Gaza. The old days are gone. A few months ago, Time magazine, published a story about how little Israelis, especially Tel Avivians, don’t care about the peace process. [here] Or was it about the state of the Palestinian people? At first some Israeli publications were furious at Time magazine and that observation of what Israelis care about. Time magazine showed people on Tel Aviv’s beach. They interviewed them on the peace issue: it turned out not at the top three things on people’s minds. People cared much more about their economic well being, the local environment in Tel Aviv (roads, parks and schools) and a bit about how the government take care of issues related to everyday life. Another issue that disturbed Time magazine is how little do Israelis care about international media and Israel’s image. My observation: welcome to the changing reality in Israel. After hoping for peace for sixty years and three generations, Israelis are just happy to be safe and have a good life. Would you blame a Parisian or a Berliner for that? How about a New Yorker or a mid-westerner? 
Can this status quo change? Of course it can. It changes every day, now with Obama making an effort to give the peace negotiations another spin, Israelis are paying a little attention (again). Yet not enough. NEXT: a few opinions of the man in the street. 

Heart of a Lion!

Prime Minister of the Palestinian Authority, Salam Fayyad, suffered a heart attack while visiting the United States for his son’s college graduation. An independent, Fatah recently joined forced with Hamas, who on April 28th had insisted on Fayyad’s departure.

Palestinian Prime MinisterThe Palestinians are demanding an end to Israeli occupation. The creation of a state recognized by the UN and the EU. The Palestinians are inspired by the Arab Spring. The Arab Spring is inspired by the need and desire of a middle class in Arab countries. Fayyad wants this for his own people, who live under occupation, whose economy is in shambles, yet he sends his son to university in the United States instead of one of the many Palestinian places of higher education.

The choices for a Palestinian with such opportunities to study in their own country are as follows:

In the Gaza Strip there is Al-Aqsa University, University College of Applied Sciences, Al-Azhar University, Al-Quds Open University, Islamic University of Gaza, Universal Studies Academy, Palestine Technical College, University of Palestine, Gaza University.

In the West Bank there is, Arab American University, Al-Quds Open University, Al-Quds University, An-Najah National University, Bethlehem Bible College, Bethlehem University, Birzeit University, Edward Said National Conservatory of Music, Hebron University, Ibrahimieh College, Khodori Institute and Tulkarm Palestine Polytechnic University.

Meanwhile, Fayyad is recovering and is expected to leave the Seton Medical Center in Austin, Texas, later this week.

His spokesman says:

“Fayyad felt strong chest pain on Sunday and went to the hospital to be tested. He says Fayyad suffered a heart attack while in the hospital. Zakout says tests showed a blockage in a coronary artery. Doctors performed a catheterization to open the artery.”

Fayyad, a heavy smoker, has been prime minister since 2007. The political independent could lose his job as a result of a recent reconciliation agreement between political rivals Hamas and Fatah.

Fayyad studied at the American University in Beirut, Saint Edward’s University, and the University of Texas in Austin, where his son goes.

Boy Brings Life of Neo-Nazi Dad to an End

How about this one? On Sunday, May 1, a fourth-grader from Riverside, California, took a Rossi .357 revolver out of his dad’s closet and fired it at the sleeping man laying on the living room couch.

The 10-year-old child was arrested for the murder. Tried in juvenile court, the next hearing date is scheduled for July 22. If found guilty the boy will remain in juvenile hall until he is age 18, then he will be placed in another youth detention facility, until the age of 25.

So who was the dad? And why did the boy do it?

According to the court documents, Jeff Hall, who died of a gunshot wound to the head, was a well-known Neo-Nazi leader. The boy also claimed Hall beat he and his mother regularly, and he feared they were going to divorce.

Juvenile court Judge Charles Koosed agreed last Wednesday to delay taking the plea from the 10-year-old. The judge said he and the boy’s attorney agree the child should first have a psych evaluation. Among possible pleas are not guilty by reason of insanity.

The boy’s stepmother, Krista McCary, has been charged with child endangerment and failure to properly store a firearm. Police officers said not only did Hall and McCary keep numerous weapons in the home, but that three of their children knew how to access the .357 revolver that was used in the shooting.

In 2010, Jeff Hall gained media attention during his campaign for a seat on the Western Municipal Water District in Riverside. During his campaign for the seat he was open about his Neo-Nazi convictions. During his tenure at the National Socialist Movement, Hall piloted demonstrations in Los Angeles and Riverside in which supporters yelled “white power” and waved swastika flags while giving the ‘heil Hitler’ Nazi hand salute.

Beck to the Rescue

Glenn Beck will be holding a major rally in Israel in August.

He said recently:

“Things in Israel are going to get bad…it’s only a matter of time…They are going to attack the center of our faith, our common faith, and that is Jerusalem. And it won’t be with bullets or bombs. It will be with a two-state solution that cuts off Jerusalem, the old city, to the rest of the world…It is time to return inside the walls that surround Jerusalem and stand with people of all faiths all around the world.”

The event will be called “Restoring Courage,” a spinoff of last summer’s “Restoring Honor” rally held on 8/28 in Washington, D.C.

Meanwhile, last Sunday, Pastor John Hagee of Cornerstone Church in San Antonio, TX devoted an entire service to honoring the Jewish State. Pro-Palestinian protesters got the scoop and showed up at the service, planting themselves in the audience, and standing to shout anti-Israel messages.

Abbas Does New York

I appreciate the spirit of freedom and independence but many modernist Islamist politicians are unrealistic when it comes to the situation with Israel; and the New York Times is an outlet for such figures to preach their hatred and prejudice. Ironically, the Palestinian territories are famous for their media censorship and abuse of journalists.

On April 20th, Abdullah Gul, President of Turkey, wrote an op-ed in the New York Times in which he cited the “Arab Spring” as a tangible socio-political trend toward democracy and modernity in which Israel is both the cause of all Middle East turmoil as well as the feet-dragger in the great Middle East Revolution:

“The plight of the Palestinians has been a root cause of unrest and conflict in the region and is being used as a pretext for extremism in other corners of the world. Israel, more than any other country, will need to adapt to the new political climate in the region. But it need not fear; the emergence of a democratic neighborhood around Israel is the ultimate assurance of the country’s security.”

Mr. Gul’s country is one where blood libel accusations are aimed at Israel and prime-time television airs television shows in which IDF soldiers are fictionally portrayed murdering children.

While many Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank, unified under the Palestinian Liberation Organization, curse the United States and stomp on the red, white and blue flag of the leaders of the free world, Mahmoud Abbas, Chairman of the Palestinian Authority, has taken a more diplomatic approach. He too has written an op-ed in The New York Times – a publication that is among the most syndicated print media outlets in the world.

“This month… as we commemorate another year of our expulsion — which we call the nakba, or catastrophe — the Palestinian people have cause for hope: this September, at the United Nations General Assembly, we will request international recognition of the State of Palestine on the 1967 border and that our state be admitted as a full member of the United Nations.”

Wrote Abu Mazen:

“Our quest for recognition as a state should not be seen as a stunt; too many of our men and women have been lost for us to engage in such political theater.”

The fact remains, and Abbas later in his article admits that the Palestinians could have had a state in 1947 but refused one. Why? So they could create war without a state in the name of freedom from oppression. This is more affective. This is the stunt. Had they now a “state,” recognized by the UN, though, on the borders they now have, it would be a pariah state. One that makes war with Israel – and is still, despite the strange Fatah/Hamas merger government, at war amongst themselves.

Abbas wrote:

“We have the capacity to enter into relations with other states and have embassies and missions in more than 100 countries. The World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the European Union have indicated that our institutions are developed to the level where we are now prepared for statehood. Only the occupation of our land hinders us from reaching our full national potential; it does not impede United Nations recognition.”

However, in a pluralized Israel, where Arab Muslims thrive and hold seats in Knesset, it seems strange that an “occupation,” which he cannot define, but surely refers to the settlements, is some kind of hindrance to a state that would be an ethno-cracy.

Abbas wrote:

“The State of Palestine intends to be a peace-loving nation, committed to human rights, democracy, the rule of law and the principles of the United Nations Charter. Once admitted to the United Nations, our state stands ready to negotiate all core issues of the conflict with Israel. A key focus of negotiations will be reaching a just solution for Palestinian refugees based on Resolution 194, which the General Assembly passed in 1948.”

However, Nakba day, was not peaceful. Several Israeli policemen were wounded by Palestinian stone throwers.

Meanwhile, Israel has agreed to release tax transfers to the Palestinians despite the Hamas-Fatah unity pact; after finance minister, Yuval Steinitz, said they would be withheld.

Abbas Does New York

I appreciate the spirit of freedom and independence but many modernist Islamist politicians are unrealistic when it comes to the situation with Israel; and the New York Times is an outlet for such figures to preach their hatred and prejudice. Ironically, the Palestinian territories are famous for their media censorship and abuse of journalists.

On April 20th, Abdullah Gul, President of Turkey, wrote an op-ed in the New York Times in which he cited the “Arab Spring” as a tangible socio-political trend toward democracy and modernity in which Israel is both the cause of all Middle East turmoil as well as the feet-dragger in the great Middle East Revolution:

“The plight of the Palestinians has been a root cause of unrest and conflict in the region and is being used as a pretext for extremism in other corners of the world. Israel, more than any other country, will need to adapt to the new political climate in the region. But it need not fear; the emergence of a democratic neighborhood around Israel is the ultimate assurance of the country’s security.”

Mr. Gul’s country is one where blood libel accusations are aimed at Israel and prime-time television airs television shows in which IDF soldiers are fictionally portrayed murdering children.

While many Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank, unified under the Palestinian Liberation Organization, curse the United States and stomp on the red, white and blue flag of the leaders of the free world, Mahmoud Abbas, Chairman of the Palestinian Authority, has taken a more diplomatic approach. He too has written an op-ed in The New York Times – a publication that is among the most syndicated print media outlets in the world.

“This month… as we commemorate another year of our expulsion — which we call the nakba, or catastrophe — the Palestinian people have cause for hope: this September, at the United Nations General Assembly, we will request international recognition of the State of Palestine on the 1967 border and that our state be admitted as a full member of the United Nations.”

Wrote Abu Mazen:

“Our quest for recognition as a state should not be seen as a stunt; too many of our men and women have been lost for us to engage in such political theater.”

The fact remains, and Abbas later in his article admits that the Palestinians could have had a state in 1947 but refused one. Why? So they could create war without a state in the name of freedom from oppression. This is more affective. This is the stunt. Had they now a “state,” recognized by the UN, though, on the borders they now have, it would be a pariah state. One that makes war with Israel – and is still, despite the strange Fatah/Hamas merger government, at war amongst themselves.

Abbas wrote:

“We have the capacity to enter into relations with other states and have embassies and missions in more than 100 countries. The World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the European Union have indicated that our institutions are developed to the level where we are now prepared for statehood. Only the occupation of our land hinders us from reaching our full national potential; it does not impede United Nations recognition.”

However, in a pluralized Israel, where Arab Muslims thrive and hold seats in Knesset, it seems strange that an “occupation,” which he cannot define, but surely refers to the settlements, is some kind of hindrance to a state that would be an ethno-cracy.

Abbas wrote:

“The State of Palestine intends to be a peace-loving nation, committed to human rights, democracy, the rule of law and the principles of the United Nations Charter. Once admitted to the United Nations, our state stands ready to negotiate all core issues of the conflict with Israel. A key focus of negotiations will be reaching a just solution for Palestinian refugees based on Resolution 194, which the General Assembly passed in 1948.”

However, Nakba day, was not peaceful. Several Israeli policemen were wounded by Palestinian stone throwers.

Meanwhile, Israel has agreed to release tax transfers to the Palestinians despite the Hamas-Fatah unity pact; after finance minister, Yuval Steinitz, said they would be withheld.