Olympic Committee Denies Moment of Silence for Victims of the 1972 Munich Massacre

The 2012 Olympics will mark the 40th anniversary of the Massacre in which 11 Israelis participating in the games lost their lives to a terrorist organization known as . Surprisingly, ever since the incident, no Olympic event that followed ever held a moment of silence for the victims.

While many have lobbied for the International Olympic Committee to hold a moment of silence at the opening ceremony, the IOC has refused and refused to budge on its stance. For the 2012 Olympics, both President Obama and Senator Hilary Clinton as well as other world leaders have all spoke in favor of having the moment of silence. So far, though, the IOC has showed no signs of relenting.

It is suspected that the IOC refuses to hold a moment of silence out of fear of offending Muslim nations. In fact, Jibril Rajoub, who is the chairman for the Palestinian Olympic Committee, sent a personal letter to the IOC praising and thanking the members of the board for making the decision not to commemorate the fallen Israeli athletes. He also added that allowing such a moment to proceed will only lead to divisiveness and racism.

The widows of two of the Israeli athletes who lost their lives that day are now calling for audience members to stage a peaceful and silent protest during the opening ceremony. They are asking for the spectators to remain silent when IOC president Jacques Rogge speaks at the ceremony.

While the IOC has commemorated the victims in other ways, families of the victims feel that the only true way to remember them is by having a moment of silence during the actual opening ceremony. Even with a petition of over 100,000 signatures requesting for the minute of silence, the IOC has already made it clear that no such moment will be held.

TJC’s Jewish News Week in Review: July 27, 2012

newsdesk.tjctv.com. This week’s top stories from the Jewish world the bus bombing in Bulgaria; Bob Costas keeping silent to remember lost Israeli athletes; Mindy Meyer’s surprising website and bid for New York State Senate and more!

TJC’s Jewish News Week in Review: July 27, 2012

newsdesk.tjctv.com. This week’s top stories from the Jewish world the bus bombing in Bulgaria; Bob Costas keeping silent to remember lost Israeli athletes; Mindy Meyer’s surprising website and bid for New York State Senate and more!

TJC’s Jewish News Week in Review: July 27, 2012

newsdesk.tjctv.com. This week’s top stories from the Jewish world the bus bombing in Bulgaria; Bob Costas keeping silent to remember lost Israeli athletes; Mindy Meyer’s surprising website and bid for New York State Senate and more!

TJC’s Jewish News Week in Review: July 27, 2012

newsdesk.tjctv.com. This week’s top stories from the Jewish world the bus bombing in Bulgaria; Bob Costas keeping silent to remember lost Israeli athletes; Mindy Meyer’s surprising website and bid for New York State Senate and more!

TJC’s Jewish News Week in Review: July 27, 2012

newsdesk.tjctv.com. This week’s top stories from the Jewish world the bus bombing in Bulgaria; Bob Costas keeping silent to remember lost Israeli athletes; Mindy Meyer’s surprising website and bid for New York State Senate and more!

TJC’s Jewish News Week in Review: July 27, 2012

newsdesk.tjctv.com. This week’s top stories from the Jewish world the bus bombing in Bulgaria; Bob Costas keeping silent to remember lost Israeli athletes; Mindy Meyer’s surprising website and bid for New York State Senate and more!

Syria Hints that it may Possess Chemical Weapons

Syrian authorities have issued a stern warning that it will not hesitate to employ an arsenal of against foreign invaders. The threat appears to be directed at Western nations in the event that they decide to deploy ground troops to the region.

For the U.S. and its allies, this appears to be an admission by that they indeed own a stockpile of chemical weapons. The Syrian authorities have also issued a statement that its chemical arms will only be used to ward off a foreign invasion and would never be used against its own citizens.

According to Foreign Ministry spokesperson, Jihad Makdissi, the weapons will only be used to defend itself from foreign aggression and will be up to the generals whether they are to be deployed. However, when asked whether this was confirmation that Syria possesses such weapons, Makdissi would not give a direct confirmation. He only says that if such weapons exist, that they would only be used against foreign invaders and never be used domestically.

It is believed that Makdissi’s ambiguous statements were directed particularly at the U.S., and Turkey. According to a report sent to Congress, Syria has steadily built a cache of chemical weaponry, which includes cyanide, sarin nerve agent and mustard gas, all of which can be spread through the use of firing from artillery rockets, missiles and aerial bombs.

While Syria continues to keep its enemies guessing over what it possesses in its arsenal, a diplomat from the United Nations said that in a conference with Kofi Annan, a message was leaked suggesting that any chemical weaponry Syria may own is stored in a safe location.

Aside from Syria, Israel has also been just as equally ambiguous about its own stockpile of chemical weapons. In fact, Syria and Israel are two of eight nations that continue to refuse to relinquish its cache of chemical arsenal, despite a 1997 convention for all countries to dismantle their collection of chemical-related weaponry.

Middle East Plagued by another Cyber-Attack

Cyber-attacks are the preferred weapon these days by lone wolf attackers and even orchestrated by one nation against another. Another wave of cyber-attacks has been hitting the Middle East with over 800 victims unknowingly downloading a piece of that spies on their Web activity.

The attack is being called “Madi,” and the culprits behind it are believed to be a group of Iranians who operate off a location in Canada. The hackers stole mostly email and Facebook accounts belonging primarily to businessmen and government officials in , and Afghanistan.

The victim’s computer becomes infected when a malicious malware, usually disguised as a harmless file, is downloaded. Once downloaded, the malware can spy on the user and record everything from keystrokes to login information. It can also monitor messages exchanged via email and social network as well as record audio activity of meetings that take place through Skype.

The email containing the downloadable malware was sent specifically to the intended targets and were not spam emails sent to thousands of random people at a time. The downloadable content often came with videos of missile tests or religious pictures, anything designed to lure the person into clicking on the material.

Madi is actually less sophisticated than other types of malware that has been implemented in the past. In fact, some experts are puzzled at how such a basic Trojan virus was capable of successfully making its way into the of high profile people.

Madi is just one of the many cyber-attacks that have been taking place in the past year. Two other attacks known as and sent a malware that was intended to sabotage Iran’s nuclear facilities. It has been speculated that Israel and the U.S. have been behind these attacks, though neither country has ever confirmed or denied involvement.